Potato bacon frittata

Frittata is a favourite in our house – especially for brunch with friends. Below is a modified recipe of a fantastic recipe by Sackville on Genius Kitchen. Thank you, Sackville!

Ingredients: (serves 6-8):

  • 2 Yukon potatoes, chopped
  • 1 pack of bacon, cut in chunks
  • 1 spanish onion, finely chopped
  • 7 white mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 tomato, chopped (optional: remove the peel for a smoother texture)
  • 7 eggs
  • 1 cup of shredded cheddar
  • 1/4 teaspoon of dried basil flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Peel and chop up your potatoes into cubes and throw them into boiling water to cook.
  2. Chop up your bacon into 1-2 inch chunks. Chop up your onions and mushrooms as well.
  3. Place the bacon into a large sauté pan and start frying it on medium-high heat. Once the bacon is nearly cooked, add the onion, tomato, and mushrooms and stir until cooked.
  4. Add the potatoes and gently stir in so it’s evenly mixed. Make sure the combined ingredients are level in the pan. Sprinkle on about 1/4 of cheese on the surface.
  5. In a medium sized mixing bowl, beat your eggs and add the dried basil, some of your fresh basil and thyme, salt, pepper, and 1/4 cup of the cheese. Keep some of your fresh basil and thyme aside to use for garnish when serving.
  6. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the top of the ingredients in the pan.
  7. Cover the pan and cook for a few minutes until the egg is nearly cooked.
  8. Add the remainder of the cheese to the surface
  9. Place the pan into the oven on broil for about 5 minutes – or until the top of the cheese browns slightly
  10. You’re ready to serve!

Enjoy!

Advertisements

Chinese steamed egg custard

custard.jpg

I’ve been trying to get my little man to eat his eggs, but regardless of the style – scrambled, boiled, puréed, fried, steamed – he spits them right back out. Recently, I found that making a sugar-free version of crême brulée got him to eat them, which is all well and good when I have time to nurture the eggs from pot to oven. And then, my momma came to visit and showed me the REAL way of making Chinese steamed egg custard. The eggs come out silky smooth like soft tofu and for our guy, he seems to prefer things with a smoother texture.

The greatest part is that this custard takes all of 10 minutes to make with most of it in the steamer with a timer on. In other words, it requires little to no supervision… unlike the crême brulée.

I like using whole cow’s milk or goat’s milk for my custard, as it’s for my baby, but the recipe typically uses water. If you’re making this for yourself, you can flavour the custard with a splash of sesame oil, soy sauce, and sprinkling of chopped scallions or chives.

Ingredients (for a single serving):

  • 1 egg (duck or chicken)
  • water or milk
  • sesame oil for seasoning
  • Optional: soy sauce and chopped scallions or chives

Continue reading

Homemade yoghurt

yoghurt.jpg

It’s been awhile since my last post. I’m sorry about that. It’s been a wild year – between a lengthy healing time for a concussion that forced me off all my devices, a busy pregnancy, and now new babe, poor Foodiologie has been long neglected.

Since my last set of posts, I’ve been experimenting with a lot of DIY and making my own cleaners, baby gear, and household items. I’m still undecided on whether I’ll post about those somewhere for those interested – case in point, look how badly I’m keeping up with just my food blog – but if I do, I’ll let you know here.

All that said, at my mother’s suggestion and armed with her great recipe, I did try my hand at making our own yoghurt. It came out splendidly and I’m loving how simple it is – no yoghurt kit, expensive equipment, or laborious process needed. And it tastes great.

What you’ll need:

  • 2L of 2% or Homogenized milk. The higher the fat content, the creamier your yoghurt. I don’t suggest using less than 2% as it will be quite runny – but if you like your yoghurt runny, by all means, try it! As a note, avoid lactose-free milk products as you’ll need the lactose in the milk for the bacteria to feed on to make the yoghurt.
  • 250mL of existing organic, probiotic, plain yoghurt. Nothing with added flavours as that will interfere with the process
  • A large pan with a lid – something like a Dutch oven is best

Continue reading

Kimchi made easy

kimcheeI have to confess – I’ve always been intimidated by kimchi. Not by eating it, oh no, I’ll gladly eat plenty. No, my intimidation is in making it. Kimchi has held a long-standing reputation for me as something that is both quite difficult to make and something to be revered. Friends have shared that kimchi can be a rite of passage for some, and for many, can represent a lifetime pursuit in perfecting their personal recipe and making it truly their own. I think that’s what has always intimidated me… the gravitas of it all. Kimchi deserves respect. So recently, I decided to respectfully try my hand at it and since then, I’ve been making it non-stop. So much so that I’m probably at risk of becoming the subject matter in Portlandia’s infamous “We can pickle that” skit. I digress.

The great news is that kimchi is actually simpler to make than you may think. The most important step is really the fermentation and for that, the good bacteria does all the work. (We just need to make sure we do everything to help create the right kind of environment for it to do its job.) Still, I can see how a person can spend a lifetime perfecting their recipe. The one I’m including here is a basic one that’s good to start with, which you can add to as you make more. There are plenty of more robust and complex kimchi recipes out there that include things like rice flour and an assortment of herbs and vegetables to add different flavours, but I’m going to keep it simple – since that’s what worked for me.

What will make it unique to you are the ingredients and quantity of ingredients you choose to put into it, along with how long you choose to ferment it for. The longer the time you let the kimchi ferment, the softer the cabbage and more sour the flavour. The moment you finish “dressing” the cabbage, you can already eat it fresh.

One last thing to note before we get started. Kimchi takes a long time to make not because it’s complicated, but because of the brining that needs to take place initially. What I recommend is salting the cabbage the night before you want to make the kimchee. This way, the actual process of making it will only take around 30-90 minutes (based on how fast you are at chopping everything up). Brining takes a minimum of 4 hours – but like I said, it’s best if you leave it overnight.

Ingredients: (makes about 3-4 L of kimchi depending on size of cabbage)

IMG_9231

  • Initial salt soak
    • 1 nappa cabbage (the larger the cabbage, the more kimchi you’ll have)
    • 1/2 cup of sea salt
    • water (approximately 3 litres) Continue reading

Banana bread bake-off

bananabreadbakeoffWhat do you do when you have too many over-ripe bananas and not enough time to eat them? A banana bread bake-off of course! And that’s just what we had at our office last week. Andrea and Steve rolled up their sleeves and baked their respective bests for the office to try.

The two banana wares could not be more different. Andrea’s was the health conscious’ dream. Her Supercharged banana nut and oat muffins were the guilt-free banana bread (or rather, muffin) option – with a simple variation that was vegan-friendly. Steve baked in the wee hours of the morning before coming into work – the loaf was still warm! His was a flavour-packed traditional banana loaf with all the stops.

The result: we had a happy office with full bellies and a great start to the day. Me, most of all. And the verdict? A universal draw across the board by all judges. Don’t believe us? You may just have to make them to find out for yourself.

Continue reading

Jicama mango salad

JicamaSalad

I fell in love with jicama in Mexico and have since looked for every opportunity to integrate it into a meal. Last night, we had baby back ribs for dinner and the refreshing, clean flavour of jicama was the perfect complement to the saucy, smokey flavour of the ribs.

Ingredients: (serves 4-5 people)

  • 1/2 jicama, peeled and finely sliced into strips
  • 1 regular cucumber (not English cucumber), peeled and finely sliced into strips
  • 3 limes, juiced
  • 2 stalks of cilantro (coriander), chopped
  • 1 green mango (mango that isn’t quite ripe), peeled and finely sliced into strips
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons of cracked pepper, or to taste
  • 3/4 tablespoon of cracked salt, or to taste

Preparation:

  1. Combine the sliced jicama, cucumber, and mango in a bowl and hand toss until everything is evenly distributed
  2. Juice the limes over the salad and toss again
  3. Add the olive oil, cilantro, salt and pepper. Toss yet again. Note, you’ll need a lot of salt and pepper to flavour the salad

And that’s it, the salad is ready to serve!

JicamaSalad2

My love for Pad Thai

pad thaiPad thai is one of my favourite dishes that I can rarely get enough of. While in Thailand, my husband and I would frequently walk down the street from where we were staying to get dishes upon dishes of homemade pad thai made before our very eyes. The ingredients would vary slightly depending on the lady cooking for us, but the result was always delicious. What’s more, the dishes usually cost around $1 to $2 CAD. It inspired me to try to make my own.

The other night, I finally tried my hand at making it. This recipe outlines how I made my pad thai and is simple to follow and straight forward, but does take some time. I’d recommend setting aside about 2 to 3 hours for prep and cooking time if it’s your first time making it – about 1-2 hours once you become more practiced.

Ingredients: (serves 5)

  • 3/4 of a package of dried pad thai rice noodles (package will say “pad thai” on it)
  • 2-1/2 tablespoons of dried tamarind powder or 3 tablespoons of pulp (add more if you like a touch more of a tangy, sour flavour in your pad thai)
  • 1 cup boiling hot water
  • 1/2 cup light soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons of Sriracha
  • 1 bunch of green onions (sometimes called scallions), chopped to 1 to 2 inches in length
  • 1/2 a large carrot, finely sliced into strips or quarters
  • 5 shallots, finely sliced in thin strips
  • 1 package of firm tofu (or deep fried tofu), cut into inch-long strips
  • 1/2 cup peanut oil
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil (you can also use a full cup of either peanut or vegetable oil)
  • 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 cups bean sprouts, washed and drained

Continue reading