Potato bacon frittata

Frittata is a favourite in our house – especially for brunch with friends. Below is a modified recipe of a fantastic recipe by Sackville on Genius Kitchen. Thank you, Sackville!

Ingredients: (serves 6-8):

  • 2 Yukon potatoes, chopped
  • 1 pack of bacon, cut in chunks
  • 1 spanish onion, finely chopped
  • 7 white mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 tomato, chopped (optional: remove the peel for a smoother texture)
  • 7 eggs
  • 1 cup of shredded cheddar
  • 1/4 teaspoon of dried basil flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Peel and chop up your potatoes into cubes and throw them into boiling water to cook.
  2. Chop up your bacon into 1-2 inch chunks. Chop up your onions and mushrooms as well.
  3. Place the bacon into a large sauté pan and start frying it on medium-high heat. Once the bacon is nearly cooked, add the onion, tomato, and mushrooms and stir until cooked.
  4. Add the potatoes and gently stir in so it’s evenly mixed. Make sure the combined ingredients are level in the pan. Sprinkle on about 1/4 of cheese on the surface.
  5. In a medium sized mixing bowl, beat your eggs and add the dried basil, some of your fresh basil and thyme, salt, pepper, and 1/4 cup of the cheese. Keep some of your fresh basil and thyme aside to use for garnish when serving.
  6. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the top of the ingredients in the pan.
  7. Cover the pan and cook for a few minutes until the egg is nearly cooked.
  8. Add the remainder of the cheese to the surface
  9. Place the pan into the oven on broil for about 5 minutes – or until the top of the cheese browns slightly
  10. You’re ready to serve!

Enjoy!

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Chinese steamed egg custard

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I’ve been trying to get my little man to eat his eggs, but regardless of the style – scrambled, boiled, puréed, fried, steamed – he spits them right back out. Recently, I found that making a sugar-free version of crême brulée got him to eat them, which is all well and good when I have time to nurture the eggs from pot to oven. And then, my momma came to visit and showed me the REAL way of making Chinese steamed egg custard. The eggs come out silky smooth like soft tofu and for our guy, he seems to prefer things with a smoother texture.

The greatest part is that this custard takes all of 10 minutes to make with most of it in the steamer with a timer on. In other words, it requires little to no supervision… unlike the crême brulée.

I like using whole cow’s milk or goat’s milk for my custard, as it’s for my baby, but the recipe typically uses water. If you’re making this for yourself, you can flavour the custard with a splash of sesame oil, soy sauce, and sprinkling of chopped scallions or chives.

Ingredients (for a single serving):

  • 1 egg (duck or chicken)
  • water or milk
  • sesame oil for seasoning
  • Optional: soy sauce and chopped scallions or chives

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Homemade yoghurt

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It’s been awhile since my last post. I’m sorry about that. It’s been a wild year – between a lengthy healing time for a concussion that forced me off all my devices, a busy pregnancy, and now new babe, poor Foodiologie has been long neglected.

Since my last set of posts, I’ve been experimenting with a lot of DIY and making my own cleaners, baby gear, and household items. I’m still undecided on whether I’ll post about those somewhere for those interested – case in point, look how badly I’m keeping up with just my food blog – but if I do, I’ll let you know here.

All that said, at my mother’s suggestion and armed with her great recipe, I did try my hand at making our own yoghurt. It came out splendidly and I’m loving how simple it is – no yoghurt kit, expensive equipment, or laborious process needed. And it tastes great.

What you’ll need:

  • 2L of 2% or Homogenized milk. The higher the fat content, the creamier your yoghurt. I don’t suggest using less than 2% as it will be quite runny – but if you like your yoghurt runny, by all means, try it! As a note, avoid lactose-free milk products as you’ll need the lactose in the milk for the bacteria to feed on to make the yoghurt.
  • 250mL of existing organic, probiotic, plain yoghurt. Nothing with added flavours as that will interfere with the process
  • A large pan with a lid – something like a Dutch oven is best

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Breakfast fun with Yude Tama egg molds

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The next time you make hard-boiled eggs for your kids (or yourself), try these darling Yude Tama  egg molds.

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If you’re not able to find them in a local Japanese specialty store, you can order them from Kyoto-based Bento & Co, who happily ship anywhere in the world. (More about their fantastic online store here).

The molds come in two different packages: one that contains a fish and car, and the other that includes a bear and rabbit face.

As for making the eggs themselves, the process couldn’t be simpler. So simple that your little one can help you turn the eggs into their cute, whimsical creations.

Preparation:

1) Boil your egg as you normally like them.
As a tip, counter to what is a popular practice, avoid putting salt in the water. The salt can result in a rubbery texture. I like mine medium-boiled, so I normally place my eggs in cold water where the water just covers the eggs (about an inch of water above the eggs) and bring the water to a boil. I turn down the heat to low to keep the simmer, cover the pot, and let the eggs sit for 4 minutes.

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2) Once your hard-boiled eggs are ready, put them into cold water. Let them sit for a couple minutes or so to cool enough to hold and ready your molds!IMG_7732

3) Gently peel your eggs and place them into your mold.

4) Close the mold and place the eggs back into the cold water. Let them sit for about five minutes.

5) When you open the molds, they’ll be staring back up at you as the bunny, bear, fish, or car from the mold you used.

These molds offer a great little touch of playfulness to start your day.

Tamagoyaki: Japanese rolled omelette

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I’m on an egg kick lately. I’ve long had a love for eggs, but I suspect my recent obsession has a lot to do with a multi-year hiatus I’ve taken from them (long story). So in the last couple weeks, I’ve been going all out with the eggs. (It’s quite possible this and the next post will be egg-related.) I digress.

This weekend, my egg treat(s) have been tamagoyaki, which can be described as a Japanese omelette, only it’s slightly sweetened, delicately rolled, and fried in a special rectangular pan. Tamago means “egg” in Japanese, and yaki is “grilled or fried”. You can make tamagoyaki in a regular circular frying pan, either with a silicon mold or without. If you go without, it’s just a little more work with the folding to keep the shape, but the process is the same.

Ingredients:

tamagoyaki ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon of salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon of soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of mirin (or substitute with 1/4 teaspoon of sugar and 1 teaspoon vegetable oil) Add more mirin or sugar if you prefer a sweeter tamagoyaki. Careful not to add too much mirin as it has a strong flavour to it.
  • 1 tablespoon of oil for cooking (of your choice, I like using grapeseed oil)

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Banana bread bake-off

bananabreadbakeoffWhat do you do when you have too many over-ripe bananas and not enough time to eat them? A banana bread bake-off of course! And that’s just what we had at our office last week. Andrea and Steve rolled up their sleeves and baked their respective bests for the office to try.

The two banana wares could not be more different. Andrea’s was the health conscious’ dream. Her Supercharged banana nut and oat muffins were the guilt-free banana bread (or rather, muffin) option – with a simple variation that was vegan-friendly. Steve baked in the wee hours of the morning before coming into work – the loaf was still warm! His was a flavour-packed traditional banana loaf with all the stops.

The result: we had a happy office with full bellies and a great start to the day. Me, most of all. And the verdict? A universal draw across the board by all judges. Don’t believe us? You may just have to make them to find out for yourself.

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Liquid Sunshine

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With the first day of summer officially starting today, this Canadian heart skips a little. 17 hours of daylight paired with a bowl of rose-tinted liquid sunshine – what better way to celebrate?

Often passed over in favour of its flashier neighbours, rhubarb is the unsung hero of spring and early summer. Don’t let this humble-looking plant fool you. It’s tart with a lot of spunk and packs quite the punch especially when eaten raw. Dull or disappointing are not words that I would use to describe this hardy vegetable. Served warm or chilled, my favourite rhubarb fix comes in the form of a simple compote. Nothing says summer like a generous spoonful (or spoonfuls!) over yogourt, oatmeal, your morning smoothie or a little midnight ice cream. You can even sneak it in as a dressing in a mixed green salad (yes, it even tames the bitterest of greens!). So with this salute to one of my favourite plants, I give you my recipe for a summer solstice rhubarb compote:

  • 4 rhubarb stalks (leaves removed)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 6 sprigs lemon thyme
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • squeeze of lemon (about 1 tablespoon)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla bean paste (or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract)

Trim the ends of the rhubarb and cut into 1 1/4-inch rounds. Pour the water in a wide frying pan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Add the rhubarb to the pan, sprinkle in the sugar, add the lemon thyme, lemon zest, and give the lemon a quick squeeze over the rhubarb. Stir to combine and heat the mixture for 10 minutes on medium-high heat or until almost all of the liquid has evaporated and the rhubarb is tender. Allow the mixture to cool slightly before stirring in the vanilla bean paste (or vanilla extract). Enjoy immediately or leave in the refrigerator to chill. Serves 4 or yields a healthy portion for one!