Potato bacon frittata

Frittata is a favourite in our house – especially for brunch with friends. Below is a modified recipe of a fantastic recipe by Sackville on Genius Kitchen. Thank you, Sackville!

Ingredients: (serves 6-8):

  • 2 Yukon potatoes, chopped
  • 1 pack of bacon, cut in chunks
  • 1 spanish onion, finely chopped
  • 7 white mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 tomato, chopped (optional: remove the peel for a smoother texture)
  • 7 eggs
  • 1 cup of shredded cheddar
  • 1/4 teaspoon of dried basil flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Peel and chop up your potatoes into cubes and throw them into boiling water to cook.
  2. Chop up your bacon into 1-2 inch chunks. Chop up your onions and mushrooms as well.
  3. Place the bacon into a large sauté pan and start frying it on medium-high heat. Once the bacon is nearly cooked, add the onion, tomato, and mushrooms and stir until cooked.
  4. Add the potatoes and gently stir in so it’s evenly mixed. Make sure the combined ingredients are level in the pan. Sprinkle on about 1/4 of cheese on the surface.
  5. In a medium sized mixing bowl, beat your eggs and add the dried basil, some of your fresh basil and thyme, salt, pepper, and 1/4 cup of the cheese. Keep some of your fresh basil and thyme aside to use for garnish when serving.
  6. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the top of the ingredients in the pan.
  7. Cover the pan and cook for a few minutes until the egg is nearly cooked.
  8. Add the remainder of the cheese to the surface
  9. Place the pan into the oven on broil for about 5 minutes – or until the top of the cheese browns slightly
  10. You’re ready to serve!

Enjoy!

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Toddler coconut flour birthday cake with yoghurt frosting

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For our little guy’s second birthday, I wanted to make him another healthy birthday cake, but this time, since he was older, I could go with one that was a little sweeter than the nearly unsweetened version I had made last year by Betty at Oh Everything Handmade. (Great first birthday smash cake recipe, by the way. Highly recommend.)

In my quest for a new recipe, I stumbled across the fantastic Honey Oat Cake recipe by Amy at Yummy Toddler Food.

Sadly, I wasn’t able to find oat flour and also didn’t have time to grind some up in time for all the festivities, so I changed things up and used coconut flour with a bit of rice flour (to help stabilize the coconut flour) instead. Below is my modified recipe based on Amy’s original recipe. Note that the portions in my cake recipe are a bit more than in her recipe, as I needed to make a larger cake for daycare.

Ingredients (serves about 8-10 people): 

  • Cake:
    • 1-1/4 cup of coconut flour
    • 3/4 cup of rice flour
    • 1 tablespoons of coconut palm sugar
    • 1/3 teaspoon of salt
    • 1-1/3 teaspoon of baking soda
    • 6 eggs
    • 2 cups of milk
    • 1/2 cup melted butter, slightly cooled
    • 3/4 cup honey
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Frosting:
    • 1 500g tub of plain Liberté Greek Yoghurt
    • (Optional) 1 block of plain cream cheese
    • (Optional) Food colouring

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Chinese steamed egg custard

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I’ve been trying to get my little man to eat his eggs, but regardless of the style – scrambled, boiled, puréed, fried, steamed – he spits them right back out. Recently, I found that making a sugar-free version of crême brulée got him to eat them, which is all well and good when I have time to nurture the eggs from pot to oven. And then, my momma came to visit and showed me the REAL way of making Chinese steamed egg custard. The eggs come out silky smooth like soft tofu and for our guy, he seems to prefer things with a smoother texture.

The greatest part is that this custard takes all of 10 minutes to make with most of it in the steamer with a timer on. In other words, it requires little to no supervision… unlike the crême brulée.

I like using whole cow’s milk or goat’s milk for my custard, as it’s for my baby, but the recipe typically uses water. If you’re making this for yourself, you can flavour the custard with a splash of sesame oil, soy sauce, and sprinkling of chopped scallions or chives.

Ingredients (for a single serving):

  • 1 egg (duck or chicken)
  • water or milk
  • sesame oil for seasoning
  • Optional: soy sauce and chopped scallions or chives

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Homemade yoghurt

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It’s been awhile since my last post. I’m sorry about that. It’s been a wild year – between a lengthy healing time for a concussion that forced me off all my devices, a busy pregnancy, and now new babe, poor Foodiologie has been long neglected.

Since my last set of posts, I’ve been experimenting with a lot of DIY and making my own cleaners, baby gear, and household items. I’m still undecided on whether I’ll post about those somewhere for those interested – case in point, look how badly I’m keeping up with just my food blog – but if I do, I’ll let you know here.

All that said, at my mother’s suggestion and armed with her great recipe, I did try my hand at making our own yoghurt. It came out splendidly and I’m loving how simple it is – no yoghurt kit, expensive equipment, or laborious process needed. And it tastes great.

What you’ll need:

  • 2L of 2% or Homogenized milk. The higher the fat content, the creamier your yoghurt. I don’t suggest using less than 2% as it will be quite runny – but if you like your yoghurt runny, by all means, try it! As a note, avoid lactose-free milk products as you’ll need the lactose in the milk for the bacteria to feed on to make the yoghurt.
  • 250mL of existing organic, probiotic, plain yoghurt. Nothing with added flavours as that will interfere with the process
  • A large pan with a lid – something like a Dutch oven is best

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Rust Rescue 101: Saving your cast iron or wok

The blight happened.

My beautiful cast iron griddle and grill, along with my new-ish Chinese wok both got rust. It certainly makes a case for remembering to heat up your cast irons and woks after washing to make sure ALL the water is evaporated off.

Luckily, it’s not too difficult to get rid of rust from your cookware. The bad news is that once you do, you will have to go through the lengthy process of reconditioning your pan, grill, or wok all over again.

Below is my 3-step process of how to get rid of the rust. The fourth step is thrown in for good measure.

  1. Put about a tablespoon of sea salt and oil onto your cast iron cookware or in your wok.
  2. With a piece of steelwool, work the salt and oil around the rusty areas of your cookware and scrub it off
  3. Rinse off the salt and oil. Don’t use soap. Just rinse it off so all the salt is gone.
  4. Follow the instructions for reconditioning your cookware.

Happy cast iron or wok cleaning!

Ratatouille: a simple classic

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With holiday entertaining just around the corner, I love this ratatouille for its simplicity, presentation and better yet, low maintenance. All you need to do is slice, stack, and bake. The majority of the time spent for this dish is in the baking, which frees you up to do other things – like preparing other parts of your feast or getting ready to look your best! Either way, it’s a win win.

Ingredients: (serves 4-6)

  • 1 Japanese eggplant (you can use regular eggplant too, I like the Japanese eggplants as they’re bigger in girth, which works better for stacking)
  • 4 medium tomatos
  • 1 large zucchini or 2-3 small ones
  • Olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon of dried thyme, or fresh if you have it
  • Fresh basil
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste

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Pot au feu: A winter retreat

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For those of us living in the northern hemisphere, winter is definitely here. With the shorter days, blustering winds, occasional snow, and sub-zero temperatures, this kind of climate calls for food of a heartier kind that warms both body and soul. So earlier this week, with that in mind, I made pot au feu, a traditional French beef stew and also the origin and inspiration behind the much loved Vietnamese phở noodle soups (also pronounced the same way). Not only is pot au feu hearty, but it lends itself well to communal eating as well… if you wish.

At its heart, pot au feu is made from stewing a combination of different cuts of meats and bone. It’s up to you what you use, there really isn’t a wrong way. Select both fatty and leaner cuts of meat, along with cartilaginous bone and you’ll have a great pot au feu on your hands. You’ll also be using seasonal root vegetables to round out your stew. Again, it’s up to you what you put in. I like the combination of carrots, turnip, and onions – potatoes and celery are also popular additions.

Ingredients: (serves 4-5)

  • 1 lbs. of beef shoulder roast (preferably with the bone), leave whole
  • 1 lbs. of beef round roast, leave whole
  • 1 oxtail and or 3-5 pieces of bone marrow
  • 0.75 lbs. of beef sirloin or other lean meat, leave whole
  • 7 small to medium carrots, peeled, halved lengthwise, and coarsely chopped
  • 2 large turnips or 4 to 5 small turnips, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 medium spanish onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 leek (the white part only), coarsely chopped
  • 1 bouquet garni made with thyme, rosemary, and bay leaves (Go easy on the rosemary as a little goes a long way. You should have a loose bundle of mainly thyme with about 8 to 10 small to medium stems, 1 to 2 stems of rosemary, and about 2 to 3 bay leaves, depending on the size of your leaves.)
  • 4 cloves or 1/2 a teaspoon of ground cloves if you don’t have the full ones
  • 1 tablespoon of sea salt
  • coarsely ground pepper, to taste

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